A Round-Up of Women’s Health Resources

When it comes to women’s health issues, knowledge is key! This is because many health issues that are common to both men and women can effect in ways that are vastly that how man are affected by these same diseases and disorders. Further, there are many health conditions that¬† affect women primarily or more severely than men. For example, almost 12% of women in the United States are at risk for developing breast cancer during their lifetime whereas male breast cancer accounts for less than 1% of existing breast cancer cases. In another example,¬†although heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the US, women are more likely to die following a heart attack than men, and women are more likely than men to experience delays in emergency care and to have treatment to control their cholesterol levels. To help you effectively arm yourself with the the knowledge to keep you and your loved ones healthy and cared for, we’ve rounded up reliable women’s health resources for you!

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Confronting Violence Against Women: The Role of the Healthcare Professional

Before the 1970’s, violence against women was largely unrecognized as a public health issue by the healthcare industry. However, since the late 20th century, generations of reformers have passionately and persistently worked to raise awareness of this issue among medical professionals, as well as establish practices and protocols to identify, hep, and advocate for victims. The history of this reformation is the topic of our current traveling exhibit from the National Library of Medicine – “Confronting Violence: Improving Women’s Lives.” But how far have we gotten? According to the World Health Organization, the global lifetime prevalence of sexual and physical violence among women aged 15 years and older is 30.0%. With doctors, nurses, and other healthcare professionals often the first to see women after abusive and violent incidents, it is imperative that healthcare professionals be vigilant in identifying and treating women who are victims of violence.

A neighborhood health fair organized by nurses at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 1980. Image via the National Library of Medicine

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