Open Access Week: October 24-30th, 2016

Editor’s Note:  Today we are pleased to bring you the following post from guest blogger, Sarah Norris, Scholarly Communications Librarian at UCF. Sarah is the University Libraries’ resident expert in all things related to scholarly communication and open access outreach efforts. You can find out more about Sarah, including her contact information, on the UCF Libraries page.

The 9th Annual International Open Access Week will take place October 24-30, 2016. But what is Open Access? How does it apply to you? In this post, we will look at what Open Access is and how you can advocate for Open Access publishing options as authors and use Open Access materials as researchers.

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Still Not Using EndNote? Here’s What You’re Missing

Last week we presented an “EndNote Basics” BYOL Lunch & Learn. There’s a reason we’re trying to tell all of our library users about EndNote: EndNote is a powerful tool for managing citations, organizing bibliographies and references, and for editing manuscripts. EndNote, RefWorks, and Mendeley (all similar, competing tools) are often referred to as “reference management software” or “citation management software,” but these phrases don’t do EndNote justice. If you’re still writing papers without the use of EndNote, here is what you’ve been missing!

Bad news on laptop screen

That moment when you realize you’ve been citing in the wrong style the WHOLE TIME

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Copyright Conundrums: Author Rights

Editor’s Note: For this month’s edition of Copyright Conundrums, we are pleased to bring you the following post from guest blogger, Sarah Norris, Scholarly Communications Librarian at UCF. Sarah is the University Libraries’ resident expert in all things related to scholarly communication and open access outreach efforts. You can find out more about Sarah, including her contact information, on the UCF Libraries page.

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In the Copyright Conundrums blog posts series, we discussed the basics of copyright and answered some of your frequently asked copyright questions. In this post, we’re going to expand on copyright and your rights as an author, including ways in which you can retain the copyright ownership of your work(s) when submitting them for publication.

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Getting Published: The Peer Review Process

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Congratulations, you’ve submitted your paper for publication! Now the waiting game begins. We can thank (or blame) the peer review process for that. Peer review is certainly the crossroads on your path to Getting Published.  Each month in our series we’ve been tackling an aspect of the publication process, including choosing the right journal, figuring out a journal’s scope, and deciphering author guidelines. Today we will attempt to demystify the peer review process.

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Getting Published: Deciphering Author Guidelines

Getting-Published-banner2We hope you have been following our series “Getting Published” here on the HSL blog. This month we are tackling author guidelines and instructions. Previously we discussed choosing the right journal and making sure that your chosen journal’s scope fits with the theme of your paper. Now that you’ve picked a journal, you need to turn your attention to that journal’s instructions for prospective authors. Author instructions run the gamut from succinct to overwhelming, but there are always some common things you should keep in mind. This post will briefly cover the top 10 common author guidelines and will help you tackle each one.

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Getting Published: Choosing the Right Journal

Getting-Published-banner2It’s a new year and perhaps your goal this year is to get that manuscript that’s been collecting virtual dust on your desktop published—finally! Figuring out where to start can be daunting. But think of it this way: the hardest part—writing the paper—is already done! So you’re already ¾ of the way there. Fear not, we are here with a new series on our blog called “Getting Published.” We’ll be here to guide you through the process of going from manuscript to publication that you can actually add to your CV.

So you have a paper written. Where do you publish it? The first decision you need to make is whether to publish in an Open Access journal or a traditional publication. For more information on Open Access, check our blog posts here and here.

If you’ve decided to go the traditional route, there are several venues you can use to find the perfect journal for you. Start with thinking about the main points of your manuscript, and if you haven’t already done so, come up with three to five keywords that best describe your paper. Once you have those, it will be easier to narrow down a journal. Let’s look at some options to find your perfect journal.

 

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“How Should I Cite This” Session 2: Electronic Articles from Online Journals

It’s time for the second part of our continuing series of blog posts on citations!  How Should I Cite This? Session 2: Electronic Articles from Online Journals

If you’ll recall in our first session,  we gave an overview of how to cite Government, Agency, or Organization reports and bulletins using the JAMA citation style, the official style of the American Medical Association (AMA). It’s back to the basics for this session, so we’ll go over a citation format you’ll likely find yourself using over and over again. Particularly because our library is 98% electronic and all of our journals can be accessed digitally, we think it’s appropriate to gain a good understanding of how to cite Electronic Articles from Online Journals. Here’s a link to the example document for this session: http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/4/11/e006071.full

Elements used in Citing Journal Articles

According to the 10th edition of the AMA Manual of Style¹, references to electronic journal articles should usually include the following details:

  1. Authors’ last names and initials
  2. Title of article and subtitle (if any)
  3. Abbreviated name of journal
  4. Year
  5. Volume number
  6. Part or supplement number (if it would help to find the journal article again), and issue month or number
  7. Page numbers
  8. URL (electronic articles only)
  9. Accessed date (electronic articles only)
  10. DOI (electronic articles only)

Each element is followed by a period.

Using the example document for this session, we can find this information pretty easily on the webpage. The fields we need to fill can be addressed by examining the top portion of the article.

  1. The main author is Yue Leng, followed by a bunch of  colleagues
  2. The title of the document is Daytime napping, sleep duration and serum C reactive protein: a population-based cohort study.
  3. The journal title is BMJ Open
  4. This was published in 2014
  5.  This article was published in Volume 4
  6. The article can be found in Issue 11 of this journal
  7. The page numbers aren’t as obvious in this one, but can also be found at the top: e006071
  8.  The URL can be taken from the web address: http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/4/11/e006071.full
  9.  The access date is whatever month, day, and year you accessed the document
  10.  The Article DOI (or Digital Object Identifier) is doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006071

 

The Finished Citation

When put together as an actual citation, our journal article will look like this:

Leng Y,  Ahmadi-Abhari S, Wainwright NWJ, et al. Daytime napping, sleep duration and serum C reactive protein: a population-based cohort study. BMJ Open. 2014; 4(11): e006071. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006071

It’s important to note in this particular instance some adjustments to our completed citation. First, in regards to the treatment of the authors, the AMA Manual of Style dictates that in cases of more than 6 authors, only the first three should be included by name, followed by “et al” ². Second, it looks as though we’ve neglected to abbreviate the journal title, BMJ Open, but this title is actually already in the correct format. If ever you want to confirm the proper abbreviation for a journal title, you can check out the PubMed Journal Database for a list of abbreviations. Finally, you’ll note we will not need to include the details for spot 8 or 9 in our citation; if the article provides you with a DOI, the URL and date accessed fields are not necessary (in fact, it’s preferable if you don’t use the URL if possible). If the article didn’t have a DOI provided, you could attempt to look one up, or format the citation to include the URL and date accessed like so:

Leng Y,  Ahmadi-Abhari S, Wainwright NWJ, et al. Daytime napping, sleep duration and serum C reactive protein: a population-based cohort study. BMJ Open. 2014; 4(11): e006071.  http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/4/11/e006071.full. Accessed November 13, 2014

 

You can learn more about citing electronic articles by visiting our JAMA Citation Library Guide and exploring the resources there, and also by accessing either the electronic copy of the AMA Manual of Style we have in our ebooks collection, or the two print copies available in our reference collection.  You can also stop by the library and ask one of our library staff for additional help Monday through Friday 8-5. Happy citing!

 

 

1. Iverson C. Online journals. In: AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors. New York, NY: Oxford University Press; 2007. http://www.amamanualofstyle.com/view/10.1093/jama/9780195176339.001.0001/med-9780195176339-div2-81#. Accessed November 13, 2014

2. Iverson C. Authors. In: AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors. New York, NY: Oxford University Press; 2007. http://www.amamanualofstyle.com/view/10.1093/jama/9780195176339.001.0001/med-9780195176339-div1-38. Accessed  November 13, 2014