Open Access Week: October 24-30th, 2016

Editor’s Note:  Today we are pleased to bring you the following post from guest blogger, Sarah Norris, Scholarly Communications Librarian at UCF. Sarah is the University Libraries’ resident expert in all things related to scholarly communication and open access outreach efforts. You can find out more about Sarah, including her contact information, on the UCF Libraries page.

The 9th Annual International Open Access Week will take place October 24-30, 2016. But what is Open Access? How does it apply to you? In this post, we will look at what Open Access is and how you can advocate for Open Access publishing options as authors and use Open Access materials as researchers.

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Still Not Using EndNote? Here’s What You’re Missing

Last week we presented an “EndNote Basics” BYOL Lunch & Learn. There’s a reason we’re trying to tell all of our library users about EndNote: EndNote is a powerful tool for managing citations, organizing bibliographies and references, and for editing manuscripts. EndNote, RefWorks, and Mendeley (all similar, competing tools) are often referred to as “reference management software” or “citation management software,” but these phrases don’t do EndNote justice. If you’re still writing papers without the use of EndNote, here is what you’ve been missing!

Bad news on laptop screen

That moment when you realize you’ve been citing in the wrong style the WHOLE TIME

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Copyright Conundrums: Author Rights

Editor’s Note: For this month’s edition of Copyright Conundrums, we are pleased to bring you the following post from guest blogger, Sarah Norris, Scholarly Communications Librarian at UCF. Sarah is the University Libraries’ resident expert in all things related to scholarly communication and open access outreach efforts. You can find out more about Sarah, including her contact information, on the UCF Libraries page.

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In the Copyright Conundrums blog posts series, we discussed the basics of copyright and answered some of your frequently asked copyright questions. In this post, we’re going to expand on copyright and your rights as an author, including ways in which you can retain the copyright ownership of your work(s) when submitting them for publication.

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Getting Published: The Peer Review Process

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Congratulations, you’ve submitted your paper for publication! Now the waiting game begins. We can thank (or blame) the peer review process for that. Peer review is certainly the crossroads on your path to Getting Published.  Each month in our series we’ve been tackling an aspect of the publication process, including choosing the right journal, figuring out a journal’s scope, and deciphering author guidelines. Today we will attempt to demystify the peer review process.

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“How Should I Cite This” Session 2: Electronic Articles from Online Journals

It’s time for the second part of our continuing series of blog posts on citations!  How Should I Cite This? Session 2: Electronic Articles from Online Journals

If you’ll recall in our first session,  we gave an overview of how to cite Government, Agency, or Organization reports and bulletins using the JAMA citation style, the official style of the American Medical Association (AMA). It’s back to the basics for this session, so we’ll go over a citation format you’ll likely find yourself using over and over again. Particularly because our library is 98% electronic and all of our journals can be accessed digitally, we think it’s appropriate to gain a good understanding of how to cite Electronic Articles from Online Journals. Here’s a link to the example document for this session: http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/4/11/e006071.full

Elements used in Citing Journal Articles

According to the 10th edition of the AMA Manual of Style¹, references to electronic journal articles should usually include the following details:

  1. Authors’ last names and initials
  2. Title of article and subtitle (if any)
  3. Abbreviated name of journal
  4. Year
  5. Volume number
  6. Part or supplement number (if it would help to find the journal article again), and issue month or number
  7. Page numbers
  8. URL (electronic articles only)
  9. Accessed date (electronic articles only)
  10. DOI (electronic articles only)

Each element is followed by a period.

Using the example document for this session, we can find this information pretty easily on the webpage. The fields we need to fill can be addressed by examining the top portion of the article.

  1. The main author is Yue Leng, followed by a bunch of  colleagues
  2. The title of the document is Daytime napping, sleep duration and serum C reactive protein: a population-based cohort study.
  3. The journal title is BMJ Open
  4. This was published in 2014
  5.  This article was published in Volume 4
  6. The article can be found in Issue 11 of this journal
  7. The page numbers aren’t as obvious in this one, but can also be found at the top: e006071
  8.  The URL can be taken from the web address: http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/4/11/e006071.full
  9.  The access date is whatever month, day, and year you accessed the document
  10.  The Article DOI (or Digital Object Identifier) is doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006071

 

The Finished Citation

When put together as an actual citation, our journal article will look like this:

Leng Y,  Ahmadi-Abhari S, Wainwright NWJ, et al. Daytime napping, sleep duration and serum C reactive protein: a population-based cohort study. BMJ Open. 2014; 4(11): e006071. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006071

It’s important to note in this particular instance some adjustments to our completed citation. First, in regards to the treatment of the authors, the AMA Manual of Style dictates that in cases of more than 6 authors, only the first three should be included by name, followed by “et al” ². Second, it looks as though we’ve neglected to abbreviate the journal title, BMJ Open, but this title is actually already in the correct format. If ever you want to confirm the proper abbreviation for a journal title, you can check out the PubMed Journal Database for a list of abbreviations. Finally, you’ll note we will not need to include the details for spot 8 or 9 in our citation; if the article provides you with a DOI, the URL and date accessed fields are not necessary (in fact, it’s preferable if you don’t use the URL if possible). If the article didn’t have a DOI provided, you could attempt to look one up, or format the citation to include the URL and date accessed like so:

Leng Y,  Ahmadi-Abhari S, Wainwright NWJ, et al. Daytime napping, sleep duration and serum C reactive protein: a population-based cohort study. BMJ Open. 2014; 4(11): e006071.  http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/4/11/e006071.full. Accessed November 13, 2014

 

You can learn more about citing electronic articles by visiting our JAMA Citation Library Guide and exploring the resources there, and also by accessing either the electronic copy of the AMA Manual of Style we have in our ebooks collection, or the two print copies available in our reference collection.  You can also stop by the library and ask one of our library staff for additional help Monday through Friday 8-5. Happy citing!

 

 

1. Iverson C. Online journals. In: AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors. New York, NY: Oxford University Press; 2007. http://www.amamanualofstyle.com/view/10.1093/jama/9780195176339.001.0001/med-9780195176339-div2-81#. Accessed November 13, 2014

2. Iverson C. Authors. In: AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors. New York, NY: Oxford University Press; 2007. http://www.amamanualofstyle.com/view/10.1093/jama/9780195176339.001.0001/med-9780195176339-div1-38. Accessed  November 13, 2014

Writing Guide: Avoiding plagiarism when writing

A library patron asked this question that we thought would be useful to share:

“Are there any tools for students to use in order to detect how original their papers are?”

The answer? Yes! A quick Google search will bring up a few options students can utilize to detect plagiarism.

Plagiarism can be quickly defined as an act of fraud that involves a person stealing another person’s work, and then trying to pass it off as their own. A good and simple way to avoid this while writing is to cite your sources correctly. So far we have one blog post on correct citation formats; look out for more!

Below are a few websites that may be of use to you the next time you’re writing a paper.

  • WriteCheck will check a single paper for plagiarism and grammar  for $7.95, and will give you 3 resubmissions of that document. They have two other plans that are reasonably priced that will let you submit more papers.
  • iThenticate will check a manuscript for $50 (must be 25,000 words and under). This would be useful if you were doing heavy-duty research.
  • PaperRater is a free site, all you have to do is copy and paste your document into the website. A premium version of the site will check for plagiarism and proofread your paper.
  • PlagScan is also a free site, and there is a max of 1,000 words that can be checked at a time.

Though two of the tools above require you to pay for their services, overall, you will likely receive a better and more thorough analysis of your paper through those than through the free sites as they probably have greater access to other documents to check against.

Professors and instructors will also often have written course assignments submitted through Turnitin.com, something you may notice in your courses in Canvas. Turnitin.com access is typically restricted to use by educators, however, so any of the other tools mentioned above will be your best bet.

Another great resource to check out is Plagiarism.org. The website contains excellent information on how to properly cite sources, paraphrase passages, quote material, and more. The UCF Writing Center also has a useful guide on plagiarism and misuse of sources in a handy PDF you can view.

 

 

 

A quick grammar lesson…

We know many of our students are in the midst of their FIRE research this summer, so we thought we’d share this fun (and surprisingly informative) music video. Remember, it’s all very well and good to have excellent research to present. However, if you’re not careful, terrible grammar could ruin everything.

If you’d like some additional tips to make sure your grammar is flawless, there are some great resources available on the UCF University Writing Center website. Should you require any additional help with your writing, consultants are available to work with you in person, or online via Adobe Connect. We also hope to create some more posts on other aspects of writing, like using EndNote to manage your citations and bibliographies, so be on the lookout for those.

Happy writing!

“How Should I Cite This” Session 1: Government/Organization Reports and Bulletins

Introducing our new series of informational blog posts designed to help you with all your citation needs!

How Should I Cite This Session 1: Goverment/Organization Reports and Bulletins

Have you ever had trouble creating a citation for an item you wanted to use in your research paper, but you couldn’t figure out how to do so? The front desk library staff receives questions about managing citations from time to time, and we’d like to share a few of those questions (and their answers) with you. Since medical literature most often follows JAMA citation style, the official style of the American Medical Association (AMA), this is the style we will demonstrate.

Today’s unique citation lesson focuses on citing Government, Agency, or Organization reports and bulletins! Okay, maybe these aren’t so unique, but they’re probably less often referenced than journal articles, wouldn’t you agree? Here’s a link to the example document for this session: http://www.cdc.gov/std/stats11/Surv2011.pdf

Print Resource

Elements used in Citing Government, Agency, or Organization reports and bulletins (print)

According to the 10th edition of the AMA Manual of Style¹, references to bulletins published by departments or agencies of a government need to include the following details:

  1. Author name (if given)
  2. Title of document
  3. Where it was published
  4. Name of the department/agency/government division that issued the document
  5. Date of publication
  6. Page numbers (if specified)
  7. Publication Number (if any)
  8. The series number (if it’s part of one)

Say you’re writing a paper about sexually transmitted diseases, and you’d like to cite a document you picked up at your county health department (for arguments sake, we’ll say the PDF above was the printed version).  Using the format above, most of the relevant reference information can be found on the first page of the document.

  1. The author is considered the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as there’s no one person responsible
  2. The title of the document is Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2011.
  3. It was published in Atlanta, Georgia.
  4. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is the agency within a bigger department that issued the report; the US Department of Health and Human Services is the bigger umbrella.
  5. It was published in December of 2012

We won’t worry about the last 3 items for this one.

The Finished Citation

All together, the citation should appear like this:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2011. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Dept of Health and Human Services; 2012.

It’s worth noting that when a department appears in spot 4 as it does in this citation, instead of completely spelling out “Department”, the word should be abbreviated “Dept”. If the department is the author in spot 1, spell out “Department” in spot 1.

Online Resource

Elements used in Citing Government, Agency, or Organization reports and bulletins (online)

Say you’re writing the same paper, but went to the CDC website instead to find the report above.  Now the resource needs to be cited as an electronic resource. The format is mostly the same as above, with a few changes:

  1. Author name
  2. Title of document
  3. Pages numbers (if applicable)
  4. URL (insert the link to the document)
  5. Date of publication
  6. Date the webpage was last updated (if specified)
  7. Date you accessed the webpage

The Finished Citation

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2011. http://www.cdc.gov/std/stats11/Surv2011.pdf. Published December 2012. Accessed June 12, 2014.

Often, it’s difficult to find a date to put in spot 6, so don’t worry if you can’t find it. The point of all citations is to give the person enough information so they can find the resource themselves without trouble. So long as you give the  reader a URL that will take them most directly to the document you are referencing, your citation should be okay.

Thus ends lesson one! We have a few resources in the library that could be of use to you if you’d like to know more. There are two print copies of the AMA Manual of Style available in our reference collection for use inside the library. In addition to that, an electronic copy can also be found by searching through our ebooks on our website. Further, you can check out our JAMA Citation Library Guide for many more links to helpful tips.

1. Iverson C. Government or agency bulletins. In: AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors. New York, NY: Oxford University Press; 2007. http://www.amamanualofstyle.com/view/10.1093/jama/9780195176339.001.0001/med-9780195176339-div2-69. Accessed June 12, 2014*

*Very thorough citation there, if I do say so myself!