Resource Guide for National Diabetes Month

Diabetes is a disease that affects millions of Americans. Whether you or someone you know suffers from diabetes in some capacity, our Health Sciences Library can provide you with access to top-notch resources to help you get educated about the disease and learn how to manage it. We’ll get you started with a few of our favorite places to start looking for patient information.

Notable Consumer Health Resources

Medline Plus

MedlinePlus is a resource produced by the National Library of Medicine, the world’s largest medical library. You can rest assured that the information found within the site is reliable, up-to-date, and free. Each health topic typically includes a landing page which acts as a portal to more in-depth information. The diabetes page contains links to videos and tutorials, as well as patient handouts in multiple languages, among other quality resources. Perhaps most useful of all is that all information is presented in easy-to-understand language, so you don’t need to be an MD to make sense of the facts.
https://medlineplus.gov/diabetes.html

Center for Disease Control

The CDC houses information on a number of health topics. This month features a great page on managing diabetes, including tips for preventing complications and getting into healthy habits. The main diabetes page can direct you to a bevy of other useful resources, too.
http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/home/

Healthfinder.gov

Healthfinder.gov is another safe government resource for health information. It is simple to navigate – use the Health Topics A  – Z to search for the condition you are interested in.
https://healthfinder.gov/Default.aspx

Need any additional guidance or in-depth help? Our staff are happy to point you in the right direction. Stop by the library anytime between 8am and 5pm Monday – Friday to talk with one of us. While we’re certainly no substitute for the medical advice of your doctor, we’re experts at finding reliable health information that can help you as you both work together to make responsible decisions for your health.

Life and Limb: The Toll of the American Civil War

More than three million soldiers fought in the American Civil War from 1861-1865. More than half a million died, and almost as many were wounded but survived. Hundreds of thousands were permanently disabled by battlefield injuries or surgery. Although tragic, these injuries and the resulting medical needs revolutionized battlefield medicine, surgical amputations, and prosthetic technology. You can learn about the costs of the American Civil War, the advances in medicine that resulted, and the plight of the injured and disabled veterans at the Health Sciences Library with Life and Limb: The Toll of the American Civil War, the traveling exhibit from the National Library of Medicine. Read on to learn some highlights from the exhibit plus other ways to dive deeper into this fascinating topic!

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Five disabled veterans of the American Civil War. Courtesy National Library of Medicine.

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Come Pick Your Poison!

It’s hard to believe that not too long ago in our nation’s history it was illegal to manufacture, transport, import, export, or sell alcoholic beverages. Not much earlier, in the late 19th Century, American physicians recommended cocaine for treating hay fever and asthma, and ironically enough, as a cure for alcoholism and addiction to opiates. Things have certainly changed since those times!

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Our New Traveling Exhibit Is Here!

Come check out our newest traveling exhibit from the National Library of Medicine :“Every Necessary Care and Attention: George Washington & Medicine.”

George Washington

George Washington, by William Williams, 1794

Learn about the time in our country when the practice of medicine was slowly becoming a licensed profession. The exhibit features the history of George Washington and how his story is intertwined with the practice of medicine. Washington, who, although never wounded in battle, was injured several times while horseback riding, almost died from a severe case of dysentery, and who suffered from anthrax, pneumonia, and skin cancer. Washington’s wife, Martha, contracted measles soon after they married, and later suffered gall bladder disease. Both George and Martha Washington experienced seasonal malaria and lung problems. Finally, in their old age, they suffered from rheumatism, hearing loss, and loss of eyesight.

Come see our newest exhibit to learn why standard medical treatment was not able to save Washington from his final illness.

The exhibit, “Every Necessary Care and Attention: George Washington & Medicine,” will be on display in the library atrium through October 10, 2015.

NLM Exhibit: George Washington & Medicine

Our latest traveling exhibit from the National Library of Medicine, on display in the library atrium

Looking for medical news? Look no further!

Did you hear that antibiotic shortages are increasing in the U.S.? Or that ovary removal can reduce breast cancer death in BRCA1 gene carriers? How about that people with osteoporosis could be at higher risk for hearing loss?

medline plusIf you are looking for the latest in medical news from just-published studies, then look no further than MedlinePlus. This free government site from the National Library of Medicine provides daily health and medical news updates from HealthDay news service, as well as press announcements from major medical organizations. Health stories found here cite the latest studies from medical journals. You can also sign up to receive the latest health news delivered right to your email inbox, and search for news stories by date or topic. The coolest part? News stories are tagged with links to MedlinePlus entries on related topics. So when you read about ovary removal and the BRCA1 gene, you can also brush up on breast cancer, genetic testing, and ovarian cancer.

Happy news reading!

 

MedlinePlus: The Best Database You’re Probably Not Using

MedlinePlus: It's like you have a medical professional right in your computer

MedlinePlus: It’s like you have a medical professional right in your computer

Did you know you can access up to date, authoritative information on nearly 1,000 health topics in easy to read (i.e., non-medical jargon) language for FREE? The U.S. National Institutes of Health and the National Library of Medicine have a terrific resource called MedlinePlus geared toward the general public, and not health professionals.

Health topics in MedlinePlus are available in many different languages, from Japanese to Samoan, even Swahili and Polish. Topics are categorized by body location/system, disorders and conditions, diagnosis and therapy, demographic groups, and health and wellness. You can also find information on drugs and supplements, and watch videos and tutorials.

Although the content in MedlinePlus is not meant for health professionals, the information found here can be very useful for physicians and nurses. Materials in MedlinePlus are typically written at a 5th to 8th grade reading level, making them perfect for use as patient handouts. According to the National Assessment of Adult Literacy, about 36% of adults in the U.S. have limited health literacy, or the ability to understand basic health information needed to make health decisions. In fact only 12% of the U.S. population is proficient in health literacy.

The next time you need basic information about your heartburn, are curious as to whether you’re getting enough calcium, or want to learn more about a family member’s recent Celiac Disease diagnosis, check out MedlinePlus.

And remember, if you need any help locating good, reliable health information online, stop by the health sciences library and speak to a librarian.

Come Check Out Our Exhibit!

Every year, the Health Sciences Library works to bring in informative, historical, fun, and unique exhibits to the College of Medicine through the National Library of Medicine Traveling Exhibition Program. This year, we will be fortunate to host two exhibits; one is currently on display outside of the library.

The Literature of Prescription

“The Literature of Prescription” exhibit on display in the atrium

We are proud to host The Literature of Prescription: Charlotte Perkins Gilman and The Yellow Wall-Paper, which will be on display until Friday, January 23rd in the 2nd floor atrium. From the promotional brochure:

“In the late nineteenth century, women challenged traditions that excluded them from political and intellectual life as medical experts drew on notions of female weakness to justify inequality between the sexes. Artist and writer Charlotte Perkins Gilman, who was discouraged from pursuing a career to preserve her health, rejected these ideas in a terrifying short story title “The Yellow Wall-Paper.” Her famous tale served as an indictment of the medical profession and social conventions that restrict women’s professional and creative opportunities.”

The exhibit is open to the public for viewing, as well! Please note the business hours for the College of Medicine while planning your visit. If you can’t find an opportunity to come by the library to view the physical exhibit, you can visit the exhibition website to learn all about it.

 

Celebrate Multicultural Day at the COM!

We hope you’ve had a great Diversity Week and had a chance to go to some of the sessions during the week. If you happened to miss any of our activity on Twitter, we’ve been posting links to relevant resources and exhibits to do with Diversity in Medicine this week. Be sure to check out our feed for links to a number of National Library of Medicine provided resources; all of our tweets have “#DiversityWeek” attached to them.

Today at 4:30pm on the Piazza, the College of Medicine Office for Diversity and Inclusion will round out the week with a Multicultural Day Celebration. One of our library staff, Natasha Williams, is in charge of the planning committee for the event. A lot of work has gone into making the event successful, but what’s a party without a crowd to have fun with? She encourages everyone to come out to enjoy samples of international foods and drinks, and enjoy a unique performance by some of our students at the Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences. There’s plenty of fun to be had, so please consider stopping by before you head home for the evening. The event is scheduled to conclude at 6:30pm. We hope to see you there!

multicultural day

 

Come check out our new exhibit and get a treat!

You may be wondering about the group of large poster panels currently on display in the library Reading Room; they make up the latest exhibit we are borrowing from the National Library of Medicine!

ShakespeareFlyer

Did you know that in Shakespeare’s time, human personality, along with physical and mental health, were described by the interaction of the four “bodily humors” – blood, bile, melancholy, and phlegm – a theory that has long since been discarded? Shakespeare’s plays are filled with references to this theory, and so this exhibit examines the intersection between literature and medicine!

Please feel free to stop by the library to check out the exhibit if you have an opportunity – we have a small treat for you to show our thanks. If you can’t make it, stop by the exhibit website to learn all about it!