Monday Morning Round Up #12

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Welcome to Monday Morning Round-Up, featuring what’s new in health and medicine from around the web!

Why poor workplace posture can lead to pain (and what to do about it) via The Washington Post 

Forward head, slumping shoulders, tilted pelvis. Sound like the Hunchback of Notre Dame in 15th-century Paris? Maybe, or just your average Joe and Jane glued to their cellphones and computer monitors in 21st-century Washington or just about anywhere in the world. “Bad posture can contribute to things like disk herniation, pinched nerves, tingling, arthritic changes in the joints, and tissue getting shorter and tighter,” says Haim Hechtman, a doctor of physical therapy and the co-founder of Point Performance, a physical therapy practice in Bethesda.

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Monday Morning Round-Up #11

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Welcome to Monday Morning Round-Up, featuring what’s new in health and medicine from around the web!

Measles outbreak in Minnesota surpasses last year’s total for the entire country the Washington Post

Minnesota’s measles outbreak has exceeded the total number of cases reported in the entire United States last year, with no sign of slowing. Health officials worry that the holy month of Ramadan, which began Friday night and brings Muslims together in prayer and festivities, will accelerate the spread of the highly infectious and potentially deadly disease, which is plaguing the close-knit Somali American community.

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Monday Morning Round-Up #9

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Welcome to Monday Morning Round-Up, featuring what’s new in health and medicine from around the web!

NIH to limit the amount of grant money a scientist can receive via Nature

For the first time, the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) will restrict the amount of funding that an individual scientist can hold at any one time, on the basis of a point system. The move, announced on 2 May, is part of an ongoing effort to make obtaining grants easier for early- and mid-career scientists, who face much tougher odds than their more-experienced colleagues.

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Monday Morning Round-Up #8

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Welcome to Monday Morning Round-Up, featuring what’s new in health and medicine from around the web!

Stanford and UC Berkeley researchers develop wearable sweat sensor as diagnostic tool via Mobi Health News 

In the form of a wrist-worn band embedded with flexibile sensors and microprocessers, researchers at Stanford and the University of California Berkeley are unlocking the molecular insights from sweat that could diagnose cystic fibrosis, diabetes and other diseases.

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Monday Morning Round-Up #7

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Welcome to Monday Morning Round-Up, featuring what’s new in health and medicine from around the web!

American Heart Association survey finds patients uncertain about how to best manage their cholesterol via the American Heart Association

According to a new survey from the American Heart Association, nearly 90 percent of the patients with high cholesterol surveyed said they understood it was important to manage their cholesterol levels. But 45 percent said they weren’t confident in their ability to do so, and another 40 percent said they were confused about how to go about it.

How Apple, Google, and other tech titans aim to shake up the way we treat disease via Stat News

Silicon Valley has audacious plans for shaking up the way we diagnose — and cure — disease. But the life sciences are far more challenging than the tech titans of this world might realize: There are countless regulatory hurdles, health care delivery obstacles, and — most of all — the challenge of untangling the extraordinarily complex biology of the human body.

From physician to felon: A doctor warns how easy it is to be bribed via The Washington Post

On Tuesday, internist Michele Martinho spoke to a small audience at the Georgetown University School of Medicine as both a physician and a felon, her world upended by an aspect of medical practice for which she received no training despite all those years of education. She accepted monthly payments of $5,000 to refer patients to a New Jersey facility, Biodiagnostic Laboratory Services, for blood tests and other screenings. Such referrals are illegal in medicine because of the potential that doctors will put their financial interests ahead of the needs of their patients.

Incidence Trends of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes among Youths, 2002–2012 via The New England Journal of Medicine

More children are being diagnosed with diabetes every year — but the extent of those increases differs dramatically across ethnic groups. A new paper published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that the incidence of type 1 diabetes in kids rose by 1.8 percent annually between 2002 and 2012. But in Hispanic children the rise was 4.2 percent. A similar trend was seen with type 2 diabetes: The annual rise was .6 percent for white children, compared to 3.1 percent for Hispanics, 6.3 percent for blacks, 8.5 percent for Asians and Pacific Islanders, and 8.9 percent for Native Americans.

Asbestos Deaths Remain A Public Health Concern, CDC Finds via NPR

A recent CDC analysis found that thousands of people are still dying each year from a type of cancer called malignant mesothelioma that is associated with inhaling asbestos fibers, even briefly or in small amounts. Even after decades of regulation, between 1999 and 2015 there were 45,221 mesothelioma deaths in the U.S. The majority of those who died were men.

Monday Morning Round-Up #6

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Welcome to Monday Morning Round-Up, featuring what’s new in health and medicine from around the web!

Study: App-based visits seem viable for post-surgical follow-ups via Mobi Health News

Women recovering from breast reconstruction surgery following a mastectomy may be just fine checking in with their doctors via their smartphone rather than having to visit in person, a small study published in JAMA Surgery suggested.

Facing significant yellow fever outbreak, Brazil appeals for more vaccine via Stat News

Brazil, in the grips of an unusually large yellow fever outbreak, has asked for millions of doses of vaccine from an international emergency stockpile. The body that maintains and manages the stockpile, the International Coordinating Group on Vaccine Provision, has approved the release of more than 3.5 million doses of the vaccine, according to the Brazilian office of the Pan American Health Organization.

Experimental Stem Cell Treatment Leaves Three Women Blind via Kaiser Health News

An experimental treatment — which blinded three women after stem cells from abdominal fat were injected into their eyes — was advertised on a government-run clinical trial website but lacked proper safeguards, researchers reported Wednesday. The report in the New England Journal of Medicine notes that the procedures were part of a national rise in the number of clinics harnessing stem cells from fat to treat a variety of diseases — even though many have not been proven to work.

New evidence shows that the lungs are a site of platelet biogenesis via Nature

Our bone marrow is constantly churning out platelets, but researchers have turned up new evidence the lungs are pumping out tons of platelets, too. Platelets are the smallest type of blood cell circulating around the body. In a mouse study published in Nature, researchers found platelet-producing cells called megakaryocytes churn out nearly 10 million platelets per hour.

Harvard researchers develop low-cost, smartphone-based male fertility test via Mobi Health News

Scientists have developed a method to test for male infertility that doesn’t require much more than a smartphone. By building an app and pairing with a custom-made 3D-printed case that can magnify sperm and reveal the number of sperm and their motility, researchers at Harvard Medical School affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General have devised a cheap, quick and convenient way for any man to perform his own semen analysis.

Monday Morning Round-Up #2

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Welcome to Monday Morning Round-Up, featuring what’s new in health and medicine from around the web!

Doctors can’t agree on disability claims via BMJ

About half of all disability claims around the world are rejected based on independent medical evaluations — but the outcomes of those evaluations largely depend on the doctor doing them. This review finds that doctors frequently disagree on which patients should qualify for assistance due to disability.

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Monday Morning Round-Up #1

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Welcome to the first addition of the new bi-weekly Monday Morning Round-Up, featuring what’s new in health and medicine from around the web!

A Nevada woman dies of a superbug resistant to every available antibiotic in the US via Stat News

The superbug that had spread through the elderly female patient was resistant to 26 different antibiotics – all that are available in the U.S. Researchers say that this case is yet another sign that we need to be taking antibiotic resistance seriously.

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