Monday Morning Round-Up #17

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Welcome to Monday Morning Round-Up, featuring what’s new in health and medicine from around the web!

Pollution to blame for 1 in 6 deaths worldwide, study finds via Stat News

Pollution is taking a massive toll on global health, with poor and marginalized populations being hit particularly hard by dangerous contamination. A new report published in the Lancet finds that diseases driven by pollution — which can range from asthma to cardiovascular disease — were responsible for more than 9 million premature deaths in 2015.

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Confronting Violence Against Women: The Role of the Healthcare Professional

Before the 1970’s, violence against women was largely unrecognized as a public health issue by the healthcare industry. However, since the late 20th century, generations of reformers have passionately and persistently worked to raise awareness of this issue among medical professionals, as well as establish practices and protocols to identify, hep, and advocate for victims. The history of this reformation is the topic of our current traveling exhibit from the National Library of Medicine – “Confronting Violence: Improving Women’s Lives.” But how far have we gotten? According to the World Health Organization, the global lifetime prevalence of sexual and physical violence among women aged 15 years and older is 30.0%. With doctors, nurses, and other healthcare professionals often the first to see women after abusive and violent incidents, it is imperative that healthcare professionals be vigilant in identifying and treating women who are victims of violence.

A neighborhood health fair organized by nurses at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 1980. Image via the National Library of Medicine

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Become an Informed Patient with These Reliable Health Information Resources

We may not all be physicians here at the College of Medicine, but there is one thing that all of us can relate to: each and every one of us has been a patient at some point. As patients, it’s so important that we listen to the advice of our health care providers so that the we get the best outcomes for our own health. But it’s equally important for us to be informed patients. And that means knowing where to look to find reliable health information. These days, we all turn to the internet, and we all know that everything on the internet is true, right? Today we’re going to steer you in the right direction and show you some great health information sites you can actually trust.

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MedlinePlus: The Best Database You’re Probably Not Using

An oldie but a goodie: this post was originally published on February 12, 2015.

Did you know you can access up to date, authoritative information on nearly 1,000 health topics in easy to read (i.e., non-medical jargon) language for FREE? The U.S. National Institutes of Health and the National Library of Medicine have a terrific resource called MedlinePlus geared toward the general public, and not health professionals.

MedlinePlus: It's like you have a medical professional right in your computer

MedlinePlus: It’s like you have a medical professional right in your computer

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What’s New: Where to Find Health News Online

If you all have been following our blog, you’ve noticed that we have a reoccurring series called the Monday Morning Round-Up, in which we round up interesting news stories about health and medicine from around the web.  We like to keep up-to-date on what’s going on in the world of healthcare, whether that’s a new treatment that’s undergoing research and trials, news about global health threats, or updated health and wellness tips, and we bet our readers do too! We decided to round up a few of our favorite online health and medicine news sources for you so that you can keep yourself abreast of discoveries and events in healthcare!

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Monday Morning Round-Up #14

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Welcome to Monday Morning Round-Up, featuring what’s new in health and medicine from around the web!

A stem cell transplant helped beat back a young doctor’s cancer. Now, it’s assaulting his body via Science

A few months before completing medical school in 2003, Lukas Wartman was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a blood cancer that’s particularly lethal when it strikes adults. So began a battle to stay alive that has involved more than 70 drugs, two rounds of cell transplants, and a staggering series of twists and turns.

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Monday Morning Round Up #12

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Welcome to Monday Morning Round-Up, featuring what’s new in health and medicine from around the web!

Why poor workplace posture can lead to pain (and what to do about it) via The Washington Post 

Forward head, slumping shoulders, tilted pelvis. Sound like the Hunchback of Notre Dame in 15th-century Paris? Maybe, or just your average Joe and Jane glued to their cellphones and computer monitors in 21st-century Washington or just about anywhere in the world. “Bad posture can contribute to things like disk herniation, pinched nerves, tingling, arthritic changes in the joints, and tissue getting shorter and tighter,” says Haim Hechtman, a doctor of physical therapy and the co-founder of Point Performance, a physical therapy practice in Bethesda.

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Monday Morning Round-Up #9

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Welcome to Monday Morning Round-Up, featuring what’s new in health and medicine from around the web!

NIH to limit the amount of grant money a scientist can receive via Nature

For the first time, the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) will restrict the amount of funding that an individual scientist can hold at any one time, on the basis of a point system. The move, announced on 2 May, is part of an ongoing effort to make obtaining grants easier for early- and mid-career scientists, who face much tougher odds than their more-experienced colleagues.

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Monday Morning Round-Up #8

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Welcome to Monday Morning Round-Up, featuring what’s new in health and medicine from around the web!

Stanford and UC Berkeley researchers develop wearable sweat sensor as diagnostic tool via Mobi Health News 

In the form of a wrist-worn band embedded with flexibile sensors and microprocessers, researchers at Stanford and the University of California Berkeley are unlocking the molecular insights from sweat that could diagnose cystic fibrosis, diabetes and other diseases.

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