Fun (and informative) things for Staff at the HSL!

No one could ever deny that we love what we do for our students each and every day – our fun posts across our various social media platforms make that pretty obvious. While most of our efforts are directed at preparing our students for life after medical school, we want our staff at the College of Medicine to know that we’re here for them as well! Here’s a short list of offerings from the Health Sciences Library that we hope our staff keep in mind and take advantage of. Continue reading

Beyond the COM: Librarians at ALA 2016

This past weekend, a few of our library staff had a chance to attend the marathon that was the 2016 American Library Association Annual Conference and Exhibition right here in Orlando at the Orange County Convention Center. For a conference that didn’t require us to actually travel anywhere, we definitely found ourselves just as busy and involved as if we had actually traveled out of state. It’s not too often we attend conferences not centered around medical librarianship, but this was a good opportunity to reconnect with our colleagues working in more traditional libraries.

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Summer Reading: A List of Book Lists

With our first ever HSL Book Club just around the corner, we’ve been talking a lot about reading lately (also, we are a library). In case the subject matter of our inaugural book, Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers, isn’t your cup of tea, we have lists of other summer reading picks for you this week. Check out the links below to peruse summer reading lists compiled by those in the know so you can pick the titles you want to read. Hurry, summer goes by fast! So head to the library, check out a lounge chair, park yourself on the Tavistock Green, and enjoy some leisure reading.

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Looking for free streaming videos? We can help you with that!

play_iconTime for an introduction to a resource you might not be aware you have access to through our library! Did you know that the UCF Libraries provide access to a number of streaming video collections? The John C. Hitt library on main campus UCF subscribes to a few different databases UCF students, staff, and faculty can access free of charge. Often, this even includes full-length films!

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You Asked, We Answered: Here’s What You Asked Edition!

Ever wonder what kinds of questions the Health Sciences Library gets asked every day? Lucky for you, the library tracks this stuff! Here is a word cloud of the types of questions the library team was asked for the month of March. Words appearing larger represent more frequently occurring subject matters, while smaller words are for the not-so-common requests. It was a busy time for the FIRE module, so poster printing and reference citing questions were at the top of the list.

 

HSL March wordle

Wait, I Can Borrow That?

If our library is any indication, library services aren’t entirely what they used to be. We only have around 1,200 or so physical books, but did you know that the items that get borrowed from our library most frequently are actually technology related? Librarians are working really hard to expand the functions of libraries, and find new ways to attract patrons. One way to do this is by providing innovative new technologies in order to bring the library into the 21st century.  We wrote a bit last year about two Florida Libraries expanding their range of services, the Melrose Center at the Downtown Orange County Library, along with the University of South Florida’s library, to include cool things like recording studios, camera equipment, and drones. It’s not just about providing books anymore!

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Beyond the COM: Library Staff at SC/MLA 2014

IMG_4755[5]This year the Southern Chapter of the Medical Library Association (SC/MLA) held its annual meeting in Mobile, Alabama from October 26 through October 30. Representing the Harriet F. Ginsburg Library were Nadine Dexter, Deedra Walton, Pamela Herring, and Michael Garner.  The theme for the meeting this year was “Making a Difference in Health.” The library presented a poster entitled “Plant a Seed and Watch It Grow: Nurturing a Foundation for College-Wide Workplace Wellness Programs” which highlighted the work that the library lead with the workplace wellness initiative that centered around the FitBit wearable technology. While the presentation was a highlight for each of us there were many other events to keep us busy throughout the day: a meeting of the Consortium of Southern Biomedical Libraries (CONBLS), paper presentations, speakers, roundtable discussions, the ability to meet with vendors face-to-face, the opportunity to network with new colleagues from other medical libraries in the southeastern region of the United States, and the chance to catch up with friends not seen since the last annual meeting.

The conference consisted of more than just attending meetings. We took advantage of down time to check out Mobile, Alabama and taste some of the local cuisine, from burgers at a restaurant called the Royal Scam (the food was in fact actual food, no tricks or funny business!) to fantastic seafood at the Oyster House (fire-grilled oysters!), one of the many top notch seafood restaurants.

Robert DeNiro was also in town filming a movie titled Bus 657 also starring Dave Bautista, Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Kate Bosworth, and Lydia Hull. Check it out on IMDB. Unfortunately Mr. DeNiro was too busy to drop by the conference.

The conference wrapped up with a banquet at 5 Rivers Delta Resource Center, where the Mobile, Spanish, Tensaw, Apalachee and Blakeley rivers flow into Mobile Bay. In the setting we were treated to a fantastic meal of local food including shrimp, fish, corn nuggets, and capped off with fresh made bread pudding. While we ate we were treated to the music of a bluegrass band.

2014-10-27 18.35.56Interesting Fact: Mobile, Alabama is the first place in the United States to start annual celebrations of Mardi Gras. During the opening of the conference we were pelted with beads by a mask-wearing krewe. Duck!

Banned Books Week: Celebrating the Freedom to Read

While we don’t have much in the way of leisure reading titles, we thought we might highlight a yearly recurring event within the library community.

Sometimes, a book may appear in a library collection, or become a part of a school curriculum, that the community may not agree with for one reason or another. Often, steps are taken to attempt to remove this title from the collection.BBW13_300x250

The American Library Association (ALA) promotes the idea that information should be free and uncensored, as well as made available to those that wish to access it, even if the subjects or topics are considered difficult, unorthodox, or unpopular. As such, once a year, the ALA holds an event celebrating this idea. This year’s events will take place from September 22nd through the 28th.

 

From the American Library Association webpage:

“Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. Typically held during the last week of September, it highlights the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community –- librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types –- in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.”

Often, books are challenged or banned by communities with the best intentions – to protect others, mostly children, from difficult ideas and information. ALA’s Office for Intellectual Freedom receives reports from libraries, schools, and the media on attempts to ban books in communities across the country, but it does not actually place bans on books. Instead, ALA works to ensure free access to information by compiling these reports into lists to inform the public about what is going on.

Here’s a list of the Top 10 Most Frequently Banned/Challenged books from 2000-2009!

1. Harry Potter (series), by J.K. Rowling
2. Alice series, by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
3. The Chocolate War, by Robert Cormier
4. And Tango Makes Three, by Justin Richardson/Peter Parnell
5. Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck
6. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, by Maya Angelou
7. Scary Stories (series), by Alvin Schwartz
8. His Dark Materials (series), by Philip Pullman
9. ttyl; ttfn; l8r g8r (series), by Lauren Myracle
10. The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky

You can view the full list of 100 here. The website also has Top 10 lists broken down by year, as well as the reasons behind why the books were challenged or banned.

Some libraries might be participating in the events ALA has planned. This year, sponsors will be hosting a “Banned Books Virtual Read-Out”, engaging in a party on Twitter, and hosting Google+ Hangouts with banned authors. Check with your local public library to see if they are planning to participate!

 

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