Confronting Violence Against Women: The Role of the Healthcare Professional

Before the 1970’s, violence against women was largely unrecognized as a public health issue by the healthcare industry. However, since the late 20th century, generations of reformers have passionately and persistently worked to raise awareness of this issue among medical professionals, as well as establish practices and protocols to identify, hep, and advocate for victims. The history of this reformation is the topic of our current traveling exhibit from the National Library of Medicine – “Confronting Violence: Improving Women’s Lives.” But how far have we gotten? According to the World Health Organization, the global lifetime prevalence of sexual and physical violence among women aged 15 years and older is 30.0%. With doctors, nurses, and other healthcare professionals often the first to see women after abusive and violent incidents, it is imperative that healthcare professionals be vigilant in identifying and treating women who are victims of violence.

A neighborhood health fair organized by nurses at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 1980. Image via the National Library of Medicine

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A Voyage to Health and Disney’s “Moana” – Two Tales of the Pacific Islands

Oscar nominations are out – did your favorite film from last year receive one? One you may have seen (particularly if you have children) was the Disney animated musical, Moana. You might be interested to know that you can learn a little more about some of the concepts from the film by visiting the library to explore our latest exhibit on loan from the National Library of Medicine, A Voyage to Health: An exhibition about the revival of Native Hawaiian Traditions. 

Hokule'a. Photo courtesy of Monte Costa and the National Library of Medicine

Hokule’a. Photo courtesy of Monte Costa and the National Library of Medicine

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Fun (and informative) things for Staff at the HSL!

No one could ever deny that we love what we do for our students each and every day – our fun posts across our various social media platforms make that pretty obvious. While most of our efforts are directed at preparing our students for life after medical school, we want our staff at the College of Medicine to know that we’re here for them as well! Here’s a short list of offerings from the Health Sciences Library that we hope our staff keep in mind and take advantage of. Continue reading

Life and Limb: The Toll of the American Civil War

More than three million soldiers fought in the American Civil War from 1861-1865. More than half a million died, and almost as many were wounded but survived. Hundreds of thousands were permanently disabled by battlefield injuries or surgery. Although tragic, these injuries and the resulting medical needs revolutionized battlefield medicine, surgical amputations, and prosthetic technology. You can learn about the costs of the American Civil War, the advances in medicine that resulted, and the plight of the injured and disabled veterans at the Health Sciences Library with Life and Limb: The Toll of the American Civil War, the traveling exhibit from the National Library of Medicine. Read on to learn some highlights from the exhibit plus other ways to dive deeper into this fascinating topic!

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Five disabled veterans of the American Civil War. Courtesy National Library of Medicine.

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Our New Traveling Exhibit Is Here!

Come check out our newest traveling exhibit from the National Library of Medicine :“Every Necessary Care and Attention: George Washington & Medicine.”

George Washington

George Washington, by William Williams, 1794

Learn about the time in our country when the practice of medicine was slowly becoming a licensed profession. The exhibit features the history of George Washington and how his story is intertwined with the practice of medicine. Washington, who, although never wounded in battle, was injured several times while horseback riding, almost died from a severe case of dysentery, and who suffered from anthrax, pneumonia, and skin cancer. Washington’s wife, Martha, contracted measles soon after they married, and later suffered gall bladder disease. Both George and Martha Washington experienced seasonal malaria and lung problems. Finally, in their old age, they suffered from rheumatism, hearing loss, and loss of eyesight.

Come see our newest exhibit to learn why standard medical treatment was not able to save Washington from his final illness.

The exhibit, “Every Necessary Care and Attention: George Washington & Medicine,” will be on display in the library atrium through October 10, 2015.

NLM Exhibit: George Washington & Medicine

Our latest traveling exhibit from the National Library of Medicine, on display in the library atrium

Come Check Out Our Exhibit!

Every year, the Health Sciences Library works to bring in informative, historical, fun, and unique exhibits to the College of Medicine through the National Library of Medicine Traveling Exhibition Program. This year, we will be fortunate to host two exhibits; one is currently on display outside of the library.

The Literature of Prescription

“The Literature of Prescription” exhibit on display in the atrium

We are proud to host The Literature of Prescription: Charlotte Perkins Gilman and The Yellow Wall-Paper, which will be on display until Friday, January 23rd in the 2nd floor atrium. From the promotional brochure:

“In the late nineteenth century, women challenged traditions that excluded them from political and intellectual life as medical experts drew on notions of female weakness to justify inequality between the sexes. Artist and writer Charlotte Perkins Gilman, who was discouraged from pursuing a career to preserve her health, rejected these ideas in a terrifying short story title “The Yellow Wall-Paper.” Her famous tale served as an indictment of the medical profession and social conventions that restrict women’s professional and creative opportunities.”

The exhibit is open to the public for viewing, as well! Please note the business hours for the College of Medicine while planning your visit. If you can’t find an opportunity to come by the library to view the physical exhibit, you can visit the exhibition website to learn all about it.

 

Come check out our new exhibit and get a treat!

You may be wondering about the group of large poster panels currently on display in the library Reading Room; they make up the latest exhibit we are borrowing from the National Library of Medicine!

ShakespeareFlyer

Did you know that in Shakespeare’s time, human personality, along with physical and mental health, were described by the interaction of the four “bodily humors” – blood, bile, melancholy, and phlegm – a theory that has long since been discarded? Shakespeare’s plays are filled with references to this theory, and so this exhibit examines the intersection between literature and medicine!

Please feel free to stop by the library to check out the exhibit if you have an opportunity – we have a small treat for you to show our thanks. If you can’t make it, stop by the exhibit website to learn all about it!