Be “Brain Smart”: A Round-Up of TED Talks about Brain Health

Sure you use your brain all the time, but do you know how your brain really works? Do you know what you can do to keep your brain strong and healthy to support your concentration, creativity, and decision-making? To help you get a better idea about your brain’s health and functioning, we’ve rounded up a selection of TED Talks about neuroscience that will teach you how health-supporting activities like exercise and sleep affect your brain’s health, what happens in your brain when you think, and focus tips for protecting and improving your brain’s health and longevity!

The Brain-Changing Benefits of Exercise by Wendy Suzuki

What’s the most transformative thing that you can do for your brain today? Exercise! says neuroscientist Wendy Suzuki. Get inspired to go to the gym as Suzuki discusses the science of how working out boosts your mood and memory — and protects your brain against neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s.

Continue reading

Get Moving! Best Exercises for Heart Health (That Aren’t Running)

We all know that in order to develop strong muscles in our body, we need to exercise. But did you ever consider that your heart is also a muscle? Arguably the most important muscle in your body, the heart also needs to be worked out to stay in tip top shape and keep ticking. If the thought of lacing up and heading out the door for a heart-thumping run gives you panic attacks, no need to stress. Running isn’t for everyone, and there are lots of ways to make your heart strong that don’t involve running—although, that’s also a pretty great way to strengthen your ticker, too!

hearthealth

Continue reading

A Guide to Holiday Wellness

An oldie but a goodie: this post was originally published on 12/10/15.

Although the holiday season absolutely warms our spirits, it can also take quite a toll on our health. Between all of the baking, office parties, holiday meals, time spent parked on the couch watching holiday movies, and stress that comes with holiday preparations and spending, it’s no wonder that the most popular New Year’s resolutions involve improving our health and wellness! Make use of these holiday wellness tips in order to keep yourself healthy and sane even before the New Year begins.

holiday-healthy-diet-350x263

Continue reading

Spotlight on Health: A Guide to Holiday Wellness

Although the holiday season absolutely warms our spirits, it can also take quite a toll on our bodies. Between all of the baking, office parties, holiday meals, time spent parked on the couch watching holiday movies, and stress that comes with holiday preparations and spending, it’s no wonder that the most popular New Year’s resolutions involve improving our health and wellness! Make use of these holiday wellness tips in order to keep yourself healthy and sane even before the New Year begins.

holiday-healthy-diet-350x263

Continue reading

Spotlight on Health: Stand up before you read this

Ever felt like this? Get up and walk around for a bit!

Ever felt like this? Get up and walk around for a bit!

Did you make a New Year’s resolution on January 1st? Was it to exercise more? New research published in the Annals of Internal Medicine finds that instead of just exercising more, we may actually need to sit less. The systematic review and meta-analysis synthesizes the results of 47 studies and comes to the conclusion that sitting for long periods of time can lead to an increased risk of early death, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes. This is true even for those of us who are already active. The research finds that those who are physically active on a regular basis but still spend the majority of their time being sedentary, still have greater risk for adverse health effects than those who are not sedentary for long periods. Even those who exercise vigorously but still sit for long periods, have a greater mortality rate than those who are not sedentary for long periods of time. The bottom line seems to be that getting our 30 minutes of daily exercise is not enough to stay healthy in the long term. We need to move more and sit less all day, every day.

To reduce the time you spend sitting down during the day, try some of these tips:

– Get a standing desk or treadmill desk

– Take regular breaks when sitting at your desk to get up and walk around

– Use your smart phone or smart watch to remind you to get up every 10 or 15 minutes

– Instead of calling co-workers on the phone, make a habit of getting up and walking to their offices

– When watching TV at home, get up during commercial breaks and stretch or walk around your house

– Set a goal to try to reduce sedentary time by 2-3 hours in a 12 hour day