Sunscreen, SPF, and Skin Cancer: Be Safe in the Summer Sun!

An oldie but a goodie: this post was originally published on 6/29/17.

It’s summertime here in Florida, and that means tons of sunshine! We certainly earn our nickname of the Sunshine State: on average, we can expect to have more than 260 days of beautiful sunshine every year. All of that sun is great for outdoor sports, beach days, and ensuring you reach your Vitamin D needs, but it can also wreak havoc on your skin’s health. So how do you protect yourself? In today’s blog post we’ll explore what the sun damage actually does to your skin, how sunscreen works, and various techniques to protect your skin from the harsh sun rays.

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Best Tips for Sunburn Aftercare

Summer is in full swing, and try as we might, sometimes we fail to avoid getting sunburned. We all know that wearing sunscreen daily, reapplying as needed, and seeking shade in the midday are the best ways to avoid sunburn (learn more about how important sunscreen is here) , but what can you do once you’ve already gotten a sunburn? Here are some tips for caring for your sunburned skin to minimize damage, peeling, and to shorten your skin’s recovery time!

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Monday Morning Round-Up #19

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Welcome to Monday Morning Round-Up, featuring what’s new in health and medicine from around the web!

How a red wine compound may prevent cancer via Medical News Today

Previous studies have suggested that resveratrol — the chemical compound found in grapes and red wine — may have anticancer properties. But now, a new study shows how the compound can stop a mutated protein, which is present in more than half of all breast cancer cases, from aggregating.

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Spring Reading Round-Up

Happy spring, y’all! One of our favorite springtime activities here at the library is (duh) reading – to be fair, we love reading during every season, but spring reading brings so many new possibilities! The extra hour of sunlight thanks to Daylight Savings Time plus balmier weather means a whole new world of reading opportunities: reading on the porch, at the park, on a hammock, walking around your neighborhood (be careful with this one), under a tree… aren’t you feeling rejuvenated just thinking about it? Since spring is all about sunny skies and nature’s renewal, we’ve rounded up some spring reading picks to indulge in as you take in the new season!

A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman

Meet Ove: he’s a curmudgeon, the kind of man who points at people he dislikes as if they were burglars caught outside his bedroom window. He has staunch principles, strict routines, and a short fuse. People call him the bitter neighbor from hell, but must Ove be bitter just because he doesn’t walk around with a smile plastered to his face all the time? Behind the cranky exterior there is a story and a sadness. So when one morning a chatty young couple with two chatty young daughters move in next door and accidentally flatten Ove’s mailbox, it is the lead-in to a comical and heartwarming tale of unkempt cats, unexpected friendship, and the ancient art of backing up a U-Haul. All of which will change one cranky old man and a local residents’ association to their very foundations. Although it may seem odd to start off a springtime reading list with a book about a man in the “late autumn” of his life, so to speak, the sense of new life and renewal in this book is heartwarming and lovely. I particularly enjoyed this as an audiobook.

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The Best Apps for Better Sleep

An oldie but a goodie: This app round-up was originally published on 11/2/17.

Happy Daylight Savings Time! Although the time switch means it’s time for warmer weather and longer days, when our clocks spring forward, it often leaves us feeling groggy and tired. In general, we tend to be fairly sleep deprived – according to the CDC, more than a third of American adults are not getting at least 7 hours of sleep on a regular basis, causing chronic sleep deprivation. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society recommend that adults aged 18–60 years sleep at least 7 hours each night to promote optimal health and well-being. Sleeping less than seven hours per day is associated with an increased risk of developing chronic conditions such as obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, and frequent mental distress. Yikes!

Luckily, aside from Daylight Savings Time, this week is also Sleep Awareness Week, giving you a prime opportunity to focus on getting better rest. There are lots of ways you can improve your sleep, including these tips from the National Sleep Foundation. To encourage you to focus on getting better sleep, we’ve rounded up some of our favorite sleep apps to help you track your sleeping habits, fall asleep faster, and sleep more soundly.

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Paving the way: A Brief History of Black Pioneers in Medicine

An oldie but a goodie: this post was originally published on February 18th, 2016.

Pursuing a career in medicine can be a challenging experience for anyone. For many aspiring Black doctors, these challenges were often associated with discrimination and a lack of opportunities to prove their worth, particularly in the early 19th and 20th centuries. Many barriers had to be torn down and doors opened before access to a quality medical education could be achieved for people of color. To celebrate Black History Month, we’re sharing with you a brief history of how these opportunities were built.

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The Most Common Holiday ER Visits – And How to Avoid Them

An oldie but a goodie: this post was originally published on 12/24/2015.

For many people, the holidays are a joyous and festive time to spend with family and loved ones. However, even with all of the warm holiday wishes and holiday cheer of the season, this time of year can also be an accident waiting to happen. During the holiday season, emergency rooms across the U.S. see an increase in visits due to holiday-related injuries and illnesses. Read on to learn about some of the most common holiday injuries and how you can avoid them.

What dangers are lurking in your holiday plans?

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The Librarians’ Book Recommendations – With a Medical Twist!

An oldie but a goodie: this post was originally published on January 14, 2016.

Do you have a goal to read more books? If you don’t, maybe you should! Besides being downright fun, science shows that reading for pleasure can actually be good for your mental and physical health.

According to a study by Dr. Josie Billington at the University of Liverpool, people who read regularly for pleasure report lower levels of stress and depression than non-readers. Pleasure readers also report higher levels of self-esteem and greater ability to cope with difficult situations. Researchers believe this may result from readers gaining expanded models and repertoires of experience when they read that allow them to look with new perspective and understanding on their own lives. According to an expansive study carried out by the UK’s National Literary Trust, reading for pleasure has also been shown to reduce feelings of loneliness in adults and increase ability to prioritize and make decisions.

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Ted Talk Round-Up: Diversity Topics

It’s Diversity Week here at the UCF College of Medicine, and we’re spending all week celebrating the vast diversity of our faculty, staff, and students! We believe that the diversity of our community makes us stronger, more inclusive, and more interesting! To help you celebrate the diversity in your community, we’re rounded up a selection of thought-provoking Ted Talks on various diversity topics. Enjoy!

Immigrant Voices Make Democracy Stronger, Sayu Bhojwani

In politics, representation matters — and that’s why we should elect leaders who reflect their country’s diversity and embrace its multicultural tapestry, says Sayu Bhojwani. Through her own story of becoming an American citizen, the immigration scholar reveals how her love and dedication to her country turned into a driving force for political change. “We have fought to be here,” she says, calling immigrant voices to action. “It’s our country, too.”

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