Getting Published: Choosing the Right Journal

Getting-Published-banner2It’s a new year and perhaps your goal this year is to get that manuscript that’s been collecting virtual dust on your desktop published—finally! Figuring out where to start can be daunting. But think of it this way: the hardest part—writing the paper—is already done! So you’re already ¾ of the way there. Fear not, we are here with a new series on our blog called “Getting Published.” We’ll be here to guide you through the process of going from manuscript to publication that you can actually add to your CV.

So you have a paper written. Where do you publish it? The first decision you need to make is whether to publish in an Open Access journal or a traditional publication. For more information on Open Access, check our blog posts here and here.

If you’ve decided to go the traditional route, there are several venues you can use to find the perfect journal for you. Start with thinking about the main points of your manuscript, and if you haven’t already done so, come up with three to five keywords that best describe your paper. Once you have those, it will be easier to narrow down a journal. Let’s look at some options to find your perfect journal.

 

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Looking for medical news? Look no further!

Did you hear that antibiotic shortages are increasing in the U.S.? Or that ovary removal can reduce breast cancer death in BRCA1 gene carriers? How about that people with osteoporosis could be at higher risk for hearing loss?

medline plusIf you are looking for the latest in medical news from just-published studies, then look no further than MedlinePlus. This free government site from the National Library of Medicine provides daily health and medical news updates from HealthDay news service, as well as press announcements from major medical organizations. Health stories found here cite the latest studies from medical journals. You can also sign up to receive the latest health news delivered right to your email inbox, and search for news stories by date or topic. The coolest part? News stories are tagged with links to MedlinePlus entries on related topics. So when you read about ovary removal and the BRCA1 gene, you can also brush up on breast cancer, genetic testing, and ovarian cancer.

Happy news reading!

 

You Asked, We Answered: Copyright edition (Part I)

We’re taking time this week to answer some of the questions we get asked most frequently. Copyright questions are certainly at the top of the list. Today we tackle the basics of Fair Use.

Question: What is Fair Use?

Answer:

Fair Use is an exception to the rights of copyright owners and allows the public to make limited uses of copyrighted work.

In determining whether a particular use is “Fair Use,” a court weighs four factors:

(1) Purpose and character of use (commercial or educational)

(2) Nature of the copyrighted work

(3) Amount and substantiality of portion used in relation to the work as a whole

(4) Effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of copyrighted work

Fair use is a balancing test – does the overall use after evaluating and applying all four factors lean in favor of or against fair use? As you can imagine, this is very fact-specific and there is no one right answer. The bottom line: think of fair use as a defense – it is always better to obtain permission or have a license to use copyrighted work (or use a work in the public domain); if not, then we may rely on fair use after balancing the four factors above.

For more information, check out:

 

 

“How Should I Cite This” Session 2: Electronic Articles from Online Journals

It’s time for the second part of our continuing series of blog posts on citations!  How Should I Cite This? Session 2: Electronic Articles from Online Journals

If you’ll recall in our first session,  we gave an overview of how to cite Government, Agency, or Organization reports and bulletins using the JAMA citation style, the official style of the American Medical Association (AMA). It’s back to the basics for this session, so we’ll go over a citation format you’ll likely find yourself using over and over again. Particularly because our library is 98% electronic and all of our journals can be accessed digitally, we think it’s appropriate to gain a good understanding of how to cite Electronic Articles from Online Journals. Here’s a link to the example document for this session: http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/4/11/e006071.full

Elements used in Citing Journal Articles

According to the 10th edition of the AMA Manual of Style¹, references to electronic journal articles should usually include the following details:

  1. Authors’ last names and initials
  2. Title of article and subtitle (if any)
  3. Abbreviated name of journal
  4. Year
  5. Volume number
  6. Part or supplement number (if it would help to find the journal article again), and issue month or number
  7. Page numbers
  8. URL (electronic articles only)
  9. Accessed date (electronic articles only)
  10. DOI (electronic articles only)

Each element is followed by a period.

Using the example document for this session, we can find this information pretty easily on the webpage. The fields we need to fill can be addressed by examining the top portion of the article.

  1. The main author is Yue Leng, followed by a bunch of  colleagues
  2. The title of the document is Daytime napping, sleep duration and serum C reactive protein: a population-based cohort study.
  3. The journal title is BMJ Open
  4. This was published in 2014
  5.  This article was published in Volume 4
  6. The article can be found in Issue 11 of this journal
  7. The page numbers aren’t as obvious in this one, but can also be found at the top: e006071
  8.  The URL can be taken from the web address: http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/4/11/e006071.full
  9.  The access date is whatever month, day, and year you accessed the document
  10.  The Article DOI (or Digital Object Identifier) is doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006071

 

The Finished Citation

When put together as an actual citation, our journal article will look like this:

Leng Y,  Ahmadi-Abhari S, Wainwright NWJ, et al. Daytime napping, sleep duration and serum C reactive protein: a population-based cohort study. BMJ Open. 2014; 4(11): e006071. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006071

It’s important to note in this particular instance some adjustments to our completed citation. First, in regards to the treatment of the authors, the AMA Manual of Style dictates that in cases of more than 6 authors, only the first three should be included by name, followed by “et al” ². Second, it looks as though we’ve neglected to abbreviate the journal title, BMJ Open, but this title is actually already in the correct format. If ever you want to confirm the proper abbreviation for a journal title, you can check out the PubMed Journal Database for a list of abbreviations. Finally, you’ll note we will not need to include the details for spot 8 or 9 in our citation; if the article provides you with a DOI, the URL and date accessed fields are not necessary (in fact, it’s preferable if you don’t use the URL if possible). If the article didn’t have a DOI provided, you could attempt to look one up, or format the citation to include the URL and date accessed like so:

Leng Y,  Ahmadi-Abhari S, Wainwright NWJ, et al. Daytime napping, sleep duration and serum C reactive protein: a population-based cohort study. BMJ Open. 2014; 4(11): e006071.  http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/4/11/e006071.full. Accessed November 13, 2014

 

You can learn more about citing electronic articles by visiting our JAMA Citation Library Guide and exploring the resources there, and also by accessing either the electronic copy of the AMA Manual of Style we have in our ebooks collection, or the two print copies available in our reference collection.  You can also stop by the library and ask one of our library staff for additional help Monday through Friday 8-5. Happy citing!

 

 

1. Iverson C. Online journals. In: AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors. New York, NY: Oxford University Press; 2007. http://www.amamanualofstyle.com/view/10.1093/jama/9780195176339.001.0001/med-9780195176339-div2-81#. Accessed November 13, 2014

2. Iverson C. Authors. In: AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors. New York, NY: Oxford University Press; 2007. http://www.amamanualofstyle.com/view/10.1093/jama/9780195176339.001.0001/med-9780195176339-div1-38. Accessed  November 13, 2014

Ebola: No hype, just information

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Everywhere you turn these days, Ebola is in the news: on TV, in print, on the internet, and on social media. The best way to not get overwhelmed by the hype surrounding this very deadly disease is to arm yourself with quality, authoritative information. Here we provide links to some trusted resources for information on the Ebola virus.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The most comprehensive Ebola site from the experts in disease. This site contains information on signs and symptoms, guidance for healthcare worker s, prevention and treatment, questions and answers, outbreak map, guidance for Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), transmission information, and much more.

Disaster Information Management Research Center

This site from the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services and the National Library of Medicine provides a host of information resources on Ebola. Links are provided to various U.S. Federal Organizations providing information on Ebola, including the USDA, the National Institutes of Health, the CDC, and the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response. There are also links to international organizations, free resources from publishers for medical responders, and multi-language resources.

World Health Organization

The World Health Organization (WHO) website has a fact sheet on the Ebola virus, frequently asked questions, information on vaccines, and the latest news.

MedlinePlus from the National Library of Medicine

This site from the U.S. government contains basic information including definitions from a medical encyclopedia, symptoms, latest news, and links to many additional resources. Also available in Spanish.

American Medical Association

The American Medical Association’s (AMA) Ebola Resource Center offers information for physicians and other healthcare workers, as well as for the general public. Information for healthcare providers includes preparing your hospital or practice, treating patients, how to handle travel and infections.

Open Access Week and Predatory Publishers

120x600October 20-26, 2014 was Open Access Week, a global effort, now in its eighth year, to promote the free, immediate, online access to scholarly knowledge. Open Access is the practice of making published scholarly research available online for free. To further this end, there are many open access journals in existence to which authors could consider submitting their work.

Authors can participate in open access by either submitting their work to an open access repository (known as the “green” path to open access) like PubMed Central, or by publishing in an open access journal (known as the “gold” path to open access). Some of these journals charge authors a fee in order to publish their work. Some of these fees can be outrageously high, as publishers try to take advantage of authors wanting to make their work available. The blog, Scholarly Open Access, has compiled a list of such so-called predatory publishers. A list of inclusion criteria is also provided.

Authors should be wary when submitting their work of publishers who, among other things:

  •  depend on author fees as their own means of operating and sustaining their journal;
  • do not identify a formal editorial or review board;
  • provide no academic information regarding the editor, editorial staff, and/or review board;
  • are not listed in standard periodical directories or library databases;
  • publish journals that are too broad – often done to attract a greater number of articles and thus bring in more revenue through author fees;
  • do minimal or no copyediting.

Always thoroughly investigate any publisher and/or journal, along with their editorial process, scope, reviews, reputation, and impact factor, before deciding whether or not to submit your work.

Writing Guide: Avoiding plagiarism when writing

A library patron asked this question that we thought would be useful to share:

“Are there any tools for students to use in order to detect how original their papers are?”

The answer? Yes! A quick Google search will bring up a few options students can utilize to detect plagiarism.

Plagiarism can be quickly defined as an act of fraud that involves a person stealing another person’s work, and then trying to pass it off as their own. A good and simple way to avoid this while writing is to cite your sources correctly. So far we have one blog post on correct citation formats; look out for more!

Below are a few websites that may be of use to you the next time you’re writing a paper.

  • WriteCheck will check a single paper for plagiarism and grammar  for $7.95, and will give you 3 resubmissions of that document. They have two other plans that are reasonably priced that will let you submit more papers.
  • iThenticate will check a manuscript for $50 (must be 25,000 words and under). This would be useful if you were doing heavy-duty research.
  • PaperRater is a free site, all you have to do is copy and paste your document into the website. A premium version of the site will check for plagiarism and proofread your paper.
  • PlagScan is also a free site, and there is a max of 1,000 words that can be checked at a time.

Though two of the tools above require you to pay for their services, overall, you will likely receive a better and more thorough analysis of your paper through those than through the free sites as they probably have greater access to other documents to check against.

Professors and instructors will also often have written course assignments submitted through Turnitin.com, something you may notice in your courses in Canvas. Turnitin.com access is typically restricted to use by educators, however, so any of the other tools mentioned above will be your best bet.

Another great resource to check out is Plagiarism.org. The website contains excellent information on how to properly cite sources, paraphrase passages, quote material, and more. The UCF Writing Center also has a useful guide on plagiarism and misuse of sources in a handy PDF you can view.

 

 

 

A quick grammar lesson…

We know many of our students are in the midst of their FIRE research this summer, so we thought we’d share this fun (and surprisingly informative) music video. Remember, it’s all very well and good to have excellent research to present. However, if you’re not careful, terrible grammar could ruin everything.

If you’d like some additional tips to make sure your grammar is flawless, there are some great resources available on the UCF University Writing Center website. Should you require any additional help with your writing, consultants are available to work with you in person, or online via Adobe Connect. We also hope to create some more posts on other aspects of writing, like using EndNote to manage your citations and bibliographies, so be on the lookout for those.

Happy writing!