MedlinePlus: The Best Database You’re Probably Not Using

An oldie but a goodie: this post was originally published on February 12, 2015.

Did you know you can access up to date, authoritative information on nearly 1,000 health topics in easy to read (i.e., non-medical jargon) language for FREE? The U.S. National Institutes of Health and the National Library of Medicine have a terrific resource called MedlinePlus geared toward the general public, and not health professionals.

MedlinePlus: It's like you have a medical professional right in your computer

MedlinePlus: It’s like you have a medical professional right in your computer

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Interlibrary Loan: The Library Service You Should Absolutely Be Using

You’ve probably stopped by our library once or twice and noticed that we have very few books on our shelves compared to most libraries. The actual number is somewhere around 1,100, but out of those, 737 are allowed to be checked out; the rest are meant to exclusively serve the medical curriculum that is taught at the College.

Being a specialized library, we realize that most of the books available for you to checkout probably wouldn’t be considered light reading. Should you find yourself interested in reading up on medical procedures, terms, or techniques, we’d be happy to point you in the correct direction – just stop by the front desk and ask one of our staff to help you find what you’re looking for on our shelves! For all our other avid readers who don’t quite fancy brushing up on their medical knowledge, we’d like to introduce you to (or remind you about) our Interlibrary Loan service!

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Open Access Week: October 24-30th, 2016

Editor’s Note:  Today we are pleased to bring you the following post from guest blogger, Sarah Norris, Scholarly Communications Librarian at UCF. Sarah is the University Libraries’ resident expert in all things related to scholarly communication and open access outreach efforts. You can find out more about Sarah, including her contact information, on the UCF Libraries page.

The 9th Annual International Open Access Week will take place October 24-30, 2016. But what is Open Access? How does it apply to you? In this post, we will look at what Open Access is and how you can advocate for Open Access publishing options as authors and use Open Access materials as researchers.

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Still Not Using EndNote? Here’s What You’re Missing

Last week we presented an “EndNote Basics” BYOL Lunch & Learn. There’s a reason we’re trying to tell all of our library users about EndNote: EndNote is a powerful tool for managing citations, organizing bibliographies and references, and for editing manuscripts. EndNote, RefWorks, and Mendeley (all similar, competing tools) are often referred to as “reference management software” or “citation management software,” but these phrases don’t do EndNote justice. If you’re still writing papers without the use of EndNote, here is what you’ve been missing!

Bad news on laptop screen

That moment when you realize you’ve been citing in the wrong style the WHOLE TIME

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Getting Published: The Peer Review Process

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Congratulations, you’ve submitted your paper for publication! Now the waiting game begins. We can thank (or blame) the peer review process for that. Peer review is certainly the crossroads on your path to Getting Published.  Each month in our series we’ve been tackling an aspect of the publication process, including choosing the right journal, figuring out a journal’s scope, and deciphering author guidelines. Today we will attempt to demystify the peer review process.

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Getting Published: Deciphering Author Guidelines

Getting-Published-banner2We hope you have been following our series “Getting Published” here on the HSL blog. This month we are tackling author guidelines and instructions. Previously we discussed choosing the right journal and making sure that your chosen journal’s scope fits with the theme of your paper. Now that you’ve picked a journal, you need to turn your attention to that journal’s instructions for prospective authors. Author instructions run the gamut from succinct to overwhelming, but there are always some common things you should keep in mind. This post will briefly cover the top 10 common author guidelines and will help you tackle each one.

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