Monday Morning Round-Up #17

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Welcome to Monday Morning Round-Up, featuring what’s new in health and medicine from around the web!

Pollution to blame for 1 in 6 deaths worldwide, study finds via Stat News

Pollution is taking a massive toll on global health, with poor and marginalized populations being hit particularly hard by dangerous contamination. A new report published in the Lancet finds that diseases driven by pollution — which can range from asthma to cardiovascular disease — were responsible for more than 9 million premature deaths in 2015.

Short on staff: Nursing crisis strains U.S. hospitals Via Reuters

Hospitals nationwide face tough choices when it comes to filling nursing jobs. They are paying billions of dollars collectively to recruit and retain nurses rather than risk patient safety or closing down departments, according to Reuters interviews with more than 20 hospitals, including some of the largest U.S. chains.

Jury to decide fate of pharmacist at center of meningitis outbreak via the Boston Globe

After a month-long trial, jurors Monday will begin deliberating whether the supervisor of a former compounding pharmacy that made and shipped drugs contaminated with a deadly mold should be held responsible for the deaths of dozens of people. Glenn Chin, who once oversaw 20 people at the New England Compounding Center in Framingham, could be sentenced to life in prison if convicted on a slew of racketeering charges, including second-degree murder.

Rural Hospice That Spurns Federal Funds Has Offered Free Care for 40 Years via NPR

In a nation where Medicare pays nearly $16 billion a year for hospice care, and nearly two-thirds of providers are for-profit businesses, the tiny volunteer hospice is an outlier. Since 1978, a hospice founded by Rose Crumb — a mother of 10 and devoted Catholic — has offered free end-of-life care to residents of Port Angeles and the surrounding area. She was the first in the region to care for dying AIDS patients in the early days of the epidemic. Her husband, “Red” Crumb, who died in 1984 of leukemia, was an early patient.

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