5 Ways the Natural Medicines Database Has Your Back

If you’ve ever found yourself wandering down the aisles of your local grocery store staring pensively at the rows upon rows of vitamins, natural remedies and supplements, you’re not alone. It can be difficult to determine if any of these products can safely support your health and wellness goals. To wrap up this month’s focus on nutrition, we’d like to introduce you to a database you may not know much about which can help you tackle those tough questions. Here are some ways the Natural Medicines database can help you out, and why you should add it to your arsenal of reliable health resources.

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Monday Morning Round-Up #6

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Welcome to Monday Morning Round-Up, featuring what’s new in health and medicine from around the web!

Study: App-based visits seem viable for post-surgical follow-ups via Mobi Health News

Women recovering from breast reconstruction surgery following a mastectomy may be just fine checking in with their doctors via their smartphone rather than having to visit in person, a small study published in JAMA Surgery suggested.

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The Health Benefits of Owning Pets

Today is possibly the best holiday of the whole entire year – National Puppy Day! The Health Sciences Library is full of animal lovers – collectively the library staff owns more than 20 animals! If you are obsessed with love animals like I do, you already know that spending time with furry friends can improve your mood and make you feel cozy inside. However, did you know that there are actually a myriad of health benefits to owning a pet? And for those of you who aren’t pet owners – many of these benefits also take effect if you just spend quality time with an animal, so you can still reap the benefits through playing with another person’s animal for a bit!

Increased physical activity

It’s no secret that owning a pet increases your likelihood to engage in physical activity – after all, most animals need to be walked and/or played with multiple times a day. This increase in physical activity is very healthy, and can even help you lose excess weight.  A study conducted by the National Institutes of Health of more than 2,000 adults found that dog owners responsible for walking their pups are less likely to be obese than dog owners who pass the duty off to someone else or those who don’t own dogs at all.

 

Spending time with animals can help you get moving more often.

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Tips for a Healthy Spring

An oldie but a goodie: this post was originally published on April 14, 2016. 

Springtime brings with it a flurry of activity and a sense of renewal. The flowers bloom, the weather warms, and I get an intense drive to clean my home and refresh it for a new season. Although this season abounds with fresh opportunities, it also brings its own health concerns (pollen, anyone?). Follow these tips to help you have a healthy spring and enjoy the best of the season!

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How will you stay healthy this spring?

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Celebrating Pioneering Women in Medicine: March is Women’s History Month!

Happy Women’s History Month!! Although you don’t have to go far to run into a brilliant female medical student, faculty member, of staff member at the UCF College of Medicine, medical education was not always so. The first American woman to become a medical doctor (Elizabeth Blackwell), obtained her medical degree in 1849, but it has been a slow journey to the more diverse (though still imperfect) medical education system in the U.S. today.

In a previous post, In Celebration of Brilliant Women: March is Women’s History Month, I discussed the current state of the gender disparity in medical education: “Although it is clear that women have come a long way in American history, the glass ceiling seems to be alive and well in academic medicine. According to the American Association of Medical Colleges, although nearly half of American medical students and medical residents are women (47% and 46%, respectively), only 16% of deans, 15% of department chairs, and 33% of senior associate/vice deans are women. As of 2014, only 22 out of the 141 deans of American medical schools were women.” Happily, the UCF College of Medicine is ahead of this national curve, and the numbers of women in academic medicine are slowly changing to match those of the larger medical profession.

We love celebrating and supporting the awesome female medical students, faculty, and staff studying at and employed by the UCF College of Medicine, as well as celebrating influential women in medicine throughout history. We’ve rounded up some of these female pioneers in medicine for your Women’s History Month reading pleasure:

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Monday Morning Round-Up #5

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Welcome to Monday Morning Round-Up, featuring what’s new in health and medicine from around the web!

Don’t write us off: People with dementia press for more rights — and respect via Stat News

Peter Mittler, an 86-year-old British psychologist and a prominent voice in Dementia Alliance International, was diagnosed with mild Alzheimer’s in 2006, and has since championed against the many indignities that people with dementia undergo.  “Everybody thinks that we are just a medical problem,” Mittler says; “people underestimate us.”

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In Celebration of Brilliant Women: March is Women’s History Month!

An oldie but a goodie: this post was originally published on March 17, 2016,

March is Women’s History Month, and with an all-female staff here at the Health Sciences Library and some serious lady-pride in our back pockets (except that they still don’t really make dresses with pockets – it’s 2017, people! Time for some pocket equality!), we are thrilled to be celebrating this month with all of you.

Although it is clear that women have come a long way in American history, the glass ceiling seems to be alive and well in academic medicine. According to the American Association of Medical Colleges, although nearly half of American medical students and medical residents are women (47% and 46%, respectively), only 16% of deans, 15% of department chairs, and 33% of senior associate/vice deans are women. As of 2014, only 22 out of the 141 deans of American medical schools were women.

Here at the UCF College of Medicine, we’re lucky to be ahead of the national curve. For example, 60% of our Medical Education faculty are women, whereas the national average for female medical school faculty is only 38%. Plus, we’re lucky to have Dean Deborah German as our fearless leader and one of the 22 female medical school deans in the U.S. In the spirit of celebrating brilliant women like those studying and employed at UCF COM, we’ve gathered just a few of the many women who have made an impact on the medical profession throughout history.

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Tech Talk Thursday: Apps for People Living with Disabilities

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Today we are living in the future. What seemed like science fiction and myth 20 years ago is actually here. We have smart phones, smart cars, and even smart houses! Okay, so we’re still waiting on warp speed and that hover board but civilians are actually taking trips to the moon just for fun (thank you SpaceX!).

In the midst of a technology-driven civilization, it’s hard to think that anyone could be left behind. Unless you are one of the 12.6% (in 2015) of North Americans living with a disability it probably doesn’t cross your mind that often. Society’s underdogs are a small but mighty population with an entirely different set of needs when it comes to technology.

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